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Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Issues, Issues...

Thank you ,for all those lovely suggestions and comments; I really appreciate it.You have brought me back from the edge ;)
Another issue to discuss,though....Framing them!
The only framer in town is good, but he is charging me a bomb...I tried ordering online and I got a nice frame for half the price.But the problem was that all the online framers are offering acrylic glazing instead of glass.Now, its good because it reduces the weight.But when I tried framing my pastel work ( even after a put  foam board  strips all around between the mount and the artwork as 'spacers') I found that the acrylic sheet attracted a lot of my pastel pigment.In fact when I took the painting out again, there was a ghost of image stuck on the acrylic glazing !I have cleaned it up and put the painting back again, hoping that this time there would be much less damage.Now I am keeping it for a few days before I check it again.I am afraid to check, actually!
So the question is, one- would the acrylic glazing work for pastels at all?
Two, is it acceptable at exhibitions? They don't mention it , but I need to be sure before I submit any work.
Any suggestions are truly welcome...

9 comments:

  1. I have heard from a pretty well known pastel artist, Lesley Harrison, that she places her glass DIRECTLY onto the pastel. This is supposed to prevent the particles from being disturbed and falling off. But I've also heard that placing glass directly on art is a big no no as moisture can develop there over time. And I think you'd have to look into specific competition rules. If you're thinking of entering a pastel specific piece then it may be a factor. Good luck!

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    1. From what I have read, there should be space between glass and the artwork to allow it to breathe.And with pastels, double matting or using spacers was encouraged so that the dust,some of which will eventually fall off; will not show on the mat.
      I guess I will learn with time :)

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  2. I've framed with only the thickness of the mat material spaced between the glazing, (both glass and plex). I haven't noticed any problems. I use pastel over sanded Bristol board. I don't apply as much pastel to fill the texture of the board..

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    1. Yes, you use less pigment so it should not be a problem.I worked heavily with soft pastels like sennelier, that must have caused it.
      I will have to experiment more with paper,too.

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  3. Since I'm not a pastel artist, I'm going to ask...Do you spray a fixative on the finished piece? Wouldn't that keep the particles on the paper itself? Just curious. Thanks Arti!

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    1. I used some fixative while I worked, but not over the last layer as it is said that it will spoil the color and texture of the uppermost layer. I guess the acrylic sheet attracted the soft pigment.My earlier painting which I framed in glass did not give me any trouble.Anyway, I will try using different papers.Experience is the best teacher!
      I must say,I like pastels very much in spite of all these troubles..they are amazing medium!

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  4. Since I mat all my pastel paintings I put it in glass and it never smudged on me..I do know if you use plastic frames it will definitely pull your pastels off. I've exhibited my paintings with no problems this way. Good luck!!

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    1. Was it because the painting was big ( almost full sheet)and it might have buckled? Well I checked again and it looks alright now.Have you used plexi glass? The frame I used was walnut wood frame but the glazing was not glass but acrylic.I will now paint a little smaller and see.

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  5. Dear Arti:) Have you even thought to buy frames at second hand stores. I have already bought a serveral for little money and to all satisfaction!xx

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